It isn’t a great feeling to have to repair or replace your roof – so steer clear of these common slip-ups that lead to it.

If every component of your home was a player on a soccer team, your roof would be your all-star goalkeeper. Whether you know it or not, your roof is consistently playing the highest level of defense, keeping you safe from any and everything, day in and day out. That isn’t to say that roof replacements and repairs aren’t necessary, because they are; very much so. But nobody is looking to revisit that chapter of their story frequently. It’s a great idea to keep tabs on your roof and see how it’s doing, but there are a lot of mistakes that put your roof’s ability to perform in jeopardy. We’ve built a handy list of these common habits that many home and business owners have that take years off of their roofs’ lives.

Taking a rooftop stroll

Don’t get me wrong, checking your roof regularly is one of the greatest habits you can have. It gives you that close-up look at what’s going on, instead of just assuming it’s all okay. You get to see things as they develop, and you allow yourself to call for help as soon as possible, which protects your roof from more serious damages. Checking for these damages and inconsistencies is best left to professionals, however. They’re trained to operate on rooftops, and know how to safely navigate the rooftops to minimize their impact. Plus, roofs are high, and if you’re not used to working on them, you probably don’t have a place up there. Keep yourself and your roof safe by letting the roofers handle it.

Cleaning your roof with materials it won’t like

I’m all for cleanliness, but roofs have specific tastes when it comes to cleaning products. Call in a professional to keep your roof looking as good as new, and you’ll be thankful for it as well. A common mistake people make is heading up to their roof personally, and cleaning with bleach, or other fume-releasing substances that are harmful not only to the roof, but to yourselves.

Taking Christmas too far

It’s the most wonderful time of the year: Christmas (or Halloween, whatever floats your boat). Decorations are a cool way to express yourselves and your holiday spirit, but think twice before setting your decorations directly to your roofs. We already know it’s dangerous to go up to your own roof; especially when it’s to hang decorations off the very edge of the rooftop. If you do choose to take to the ladders, always avoid stapling decorations to shingles. This can lead to the shingles or the flashing to tear, leading to some irreversible damage to your roof. Plus, those heavier decorations will just add more awkward weight to your roof – so use the front of your house creatively, and leave the light stuff to be clipped to your gutters.

Forgetting to check your gutters

Speaking of gutters, don’t forget them, please. They’re made to be non-impactful, so it’s easy to forget that they’re there. Especially if it hasn’t been raining. However, leaves and other debris gather inside gutters, which can clog it up and prevent it from keeping your roof moisture free. By giving them a quick clean, and pulling out any heavy debris, you save yourself a lot of stress.

Checking for leaks…by lifting your shingles

Checking your roof is a great habit, but pulling up a shingle to get a closer look is a terrible habit. You may not find a leak there, and set it back into place – but pulling it up loosened that spot, and you’ll likely find a leak coming from that very spot after some heavy rain. There are a handful of ways to check for leaks in your roof that are easy to perform, and don’t jeopardize your roof!

It’s tempting to set your roof up yourselves, and there are those that can do a great job at it too. Maintenance likewise is a great habit to have, but not everybody knows the specific needs each roof calls for. Leave it to the professionals over at The Roofing Company, where they can keep your roof working for a long time; and if it gives out, they’re the ones to replace it too. Contact them at (226) 450-0954, or find them in Brantford, Ontario.